May 27, 2019

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Outdoor Vancouver, 10 best iPhone Android Apps for the Outdoors

10 Best iPhone and Android Apps for the Outdoors

Filed in Deals, Products and Companies by on March 16, 2014 • 1 Comment
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Sometimes the best part of getting outside is turning off your smartphone and getting away from technology. But there are definitely times where your iPhone or Android can open up new activities, or put needed information at your fingertips. Here are the 10 best smartphone apps for getting outdoors.

SIDENOTE: You do NOT want to rely on your phone’s GPS for backcountry navigation, with very few exceptions. Why not? There is a detailed list of reasons in this article.

 

10. Strava

Strava Top Ten Apps Smartphone Strava quickly became my favorite web-app for tracking all my running training. The website is very clean, provides great reports, and let’s you follow your friend’s training (and comment and leave ‘kudos’ on their workouts). Perhaps, the coolest feature of Strava is the ‘segments’.

Segments are user-created, user-edited, and designate a portion of route where users can compete for time. You can use segments to compare your own times, or to compare with other user’s times who have also completed the segment. Segments are a great way to see who is in your area, and to link to the type of routes other users are riding or running.

Best of all, after you upload your GPS file to the website, it will automatically see if you ran any segments and show you your overall standings in the leaderboard for that segment. The smartphone app for Strava let’s you record your run or cycle using your phone’s GPS and directly uploads the file to your account after the workout is complete. The app also lets you see your activity feed, your profile, and explore new segments. If you use Strava you can follow me here.

Strava App: iPhone | Android | Website Cost: Free (there is a premium upgrade to unlock extra features on the website).


9. iBird

For anyone who is a birder, and tech savy, this is a no-brainer compared to flipping though a book out of your backpack. But even if you’re not a birder, I can see where this app comes in handy. There’s been several times where I’ve been out hiking or trail running and have come across owls, which I think are amazing animals. But its frustrating if you don’t know the species. Having this app on your phone is the answer.

iBird App: iPhone | Android | Website Cost: Lite version is free, or $10 for pro on Android and $20 on iOS Also slated for release in 2014 is a Google Glass version.


8. Everytrail

Everytrail App

Everytrail is another website I use a lot. It is similar to Strava above, but geared towards hiking and walking, instead of cycling and running. The website allows you to comb through hundreds of thousands of user-generated trail guides. Each guide will allow you to view the GPS tracks on  a map, download the tracks, view the elevation profile, and most have accompanying pictures and or even video. (You can see the trip reports I have created here). A few features of the app:

  • Track your route with your phone’s GPS capability – see your route map drawn while you move
  • Listen to awesome audio guides that give you hands free info at key POIs along the way
  • Plot pictures taken with your phone’s camera on your map instantly
  • Download maps to use offline when data connection is spotty or to avoid pricey roaming charges (Pro Version only)
  • View stats while tracking (distance, speed, elevation and more)

Everytrail App: iPhone | Android | Website Cost: Free for lite version, or $4 for Pro version (needed to unlock maps for offline use, and to remove ads)



7. What Knot To Do

What Knot To Do iPhone

“What Knot to Do (in the Greater Outdoors) is your pocket guide to 70 must know knots in six categories. With this App you’ll always have just the right knot at the ready, with clear step-by-step tying instructions to meet any and every outdoor need”. There are quite a few knot apps out there but What Knot To Do rises to the top.  The knots are easy to find within their categories of bends, hitches, loops, bindings, stoppers, and specials. Each knot has some background detail about the knot, and explains when and where you’d most likely need to use it. Then there a several graphics that break out the process of how to actually tie the knot. A few features:

  • Glossary of terms with over 70 entries
  • Illustrated terminology examples
  • Introduction to knots, cordage and knot tying
  • Easy to follow step-by-step tying instructions

What Know To Do App: iPhone | Website Cost: Free Android Alternative: Knots Guide (Free)


6. Google SkyMap

With SkyMap you can point your phone into the night sky to identify stars, planets, constellations, and even meteor showers. The app uses your phones GPS and compass data to identify the stars you are looking at. Or, if you want to find a particular star or planet, you can do a search for it, and SkyMap will show you where to move your phone to locate it. Pretty cool stuff!

What Know To Do App: Android | Website Cost: Free iPhone AlternativeStar Chart


5. Learn to Camp

Learn to Camp App

Learn to Camp is an app developed by Parks Canada, and its surprisingly well done. It has four basic main areas; Camping Basics, Camping Checklist, Recipes and Cooking, and Find a Park. There is plenty of simple and basic information under the Camping Basics section. This information is not very detailed, but would be useful for newbie campers. The Camping Checklist lets you create a list of items you’ll need for your trip, which are added from pre-populated categories in the app. You can then cross them off as you’ve collected the items.

The app also shows you all the National Parks and general details about each site. This app is very handy. I wish they would team up with the Provincial Parks to add those parks into the app as well.

What Know To Do App: iPhoneAndroid | Website Cost: Free


4. The Backpacker Checklist

Backpacker Checklist App

The title of the app says it all. If you’re looking for a checklist that is more robust than the checklist built unto Learn To Camp (app #, above), then this is the one you want.

The Backpacker Checklist will help you:

  • Plan ahead for what to bring
  • Locate where to get your gear
  • Calculate how much your pack will weigh
  • Assist in eliminating stuff you don’t want/need to carry

What Know To Do App: iPhone | Website Cost: Free Android Alternative: Backpack Planner ($1)


3. GPS Essentials

Although you should not rely on your phone’s GPS (see side-note at the top of this post) for backcountry navigation, if you do want to record your tracks with your phone or otherwise use its GPS, GPS Essentials is hands-down the most feature-rich GPS app out there. The above video has  a nice review of the app. A few of the features:

  • Navigate, manage waypoints, tracks, routes, build your own dashboard from 45 widgets.
  • Shows navigation values such as: Accuracy, Altitude, Speed, Battery, Bearing, Climb, Course, Date, Declination, Distance, ETA, Latitude, Longitude, Max Speed, Min Speed, Actual Speed, True Speed, Sunrise, Sunset, Moonset, Moonrise, Moon Phase, Target, Time, TTG, Turn.
  • Show the orientation of the earth’s magnetic field, shows an arbitrary tracking angle and the current target. Also a marine orienteering compass.
  • Record tracks and view them on map. Export KML files and import into Google Maps, Google Earth and others.
  • Manage routes and view them on map. Import KML files from Google Maps, Google Earth and others. Create turn-by-turn instructions between waypoints.

GPS Essentials App: Android | Website Cost: Free iPhone Alternative: MotionX-GPS ($2.99)


2. My Nature Animal Tracks

It can be exciting when you discover animal tracks out in the woods. But if you haven’t studied tracks before, you’re left to guessing what tracks you are looking at. (This happened to me last year when I saw some cougar tracks in the snow).

The My Nature Animal Tracks let’s you easily identify the tracks you’ve found.  ”Search by track size and shape in seven different illustrated categories to identify over 46 animals across North America. View actual tracks in the wild, reference illustrated gait patterns, range maps, digital images of animals and listen to each animals vocalazation”.

My Nature Animal Tracks App: iPhone | Android | Website Cost: $5 Android, $7 iPhone


1. Geocaching

Geocaching is a really fun activity I’ve posted about before. The concept is very simple. You load the GPS coordinates for a ‘cache’ onto your handheld GPS or smartphone, use the provided hints, and go and try and find the cache, usually hidden in the woods or on a trail. There are different types of geocaches ranging in difficulty, but its the perfect way to have some leisurely fun in the outdoors, especially with kids.

Geocaching.com is the de-facto place to post and find new geocaches, and the smartphone app allows you to find nearby caches using your phone’s GPS. You can view hints, record your activity history, and more.

Geocaching App: iPhone | Android | Website Cost: $9.99 Android Alternative (Free): C:Geo

http://www.outdoorvancouver.ca/best-iphone-android-apps-outdoors/#comment-23504

A nice mention from the National Wildlife Federation.

14 Apps That Will Revolutionize Your Walk in the Woods

from Wildlife Promise

iPhone in NatureMany argue that smartphones are keeping kids out of the woods and locked up behind their screens. However, these devices and the new mobile apps they put at our fingertips assist us in a lot of different ways, even when you’re out of the house and in the wilderness. You can read some thoughts around NWF’s findings in the report Friending Fresh Air: Balancing Nature and Technology.

While exploring nature is often regarded as a tech-free activity, it’s great to know that in the 21st century there are tech-savvy tools that help can us enjoy nature and wildlife in a whole new way.

Here are 14 apps that will turn even the most urban person into a naturalist in no time.

 

trailhead1. The North Face Trailhead App

The outdoor apparel retailer The North Face has launched an exploratory trail-finding app for iPhone. Its function is to help users find and share the best paths and routes for hikers, skiers, fly fishermen, and others who don’t want to get lost when they head for the hills. The free app enables users to search by activity type and distance, proximity (either from your current location using GPS or by zip code), and user ratings. The database of routes is pulled from EveryTrail.com, a platform for swapping trails with fellow enthusiasts.

 

2. Florafolio

The ultimate native plant resource for nature enthusiasts is now available as an app for the iPhone and iPod Touch. Florafolio is an interactive guide that allows users to focus on the stunning variety of trees, shrubs, perennials, ferns, vines, and grasses indigenous to Eastern Canada and the Northeastern region of the US. It’s an excellent directory for anyone who’s looking to identify native plant species in the wild.

 

Ibirdplus3. iBird Plus Guide to Birds

Designed for both iPhone and iPad, iBird Plus is one of the more pricier apps, at $14.99. However its database has a total of 938 species so it’s far more extensive than some of the other bird apps available today.

 

wildlab4. WildLab Bird

Not as extensive as the iBird Plus, WildLab Bird is a free app that can identify 200 species of birds. It engages learners with the basics of bird identification. Along with associated curricula and educational activities found on the WildLab.org Web site, WildLab Bird is a powerful way to see the environment in a whole new way.

 

LeafSnap5. Leafsnap

Leafsnap, free on iOS, is a comprehensive nature-guide app that features an extensive directory of North American plants. You can rifle through the directory manually, and filter the species by leaf shapes, flowers, fruit, and so on. Tapping an entry takes you to a photo-rich data page that displays examples of the plant’s bark and seeds. There is also a text description of habitats and bloom times.

 

MyNatureAnimalTracks6. MyNature Animal Tracks

Priced on upwards of $8 USD, according to naturalist D. Thomas this is “a must-have app for anyone outdoors.” MyNature Animal Tracks allows users to identify any animal track in your area when you reference this well-made guide. It is chock-full of great information and photos that are not just illustrations, but actual photographs of a wide variety of animal tracks.

 

inature7. iNaturalist

Explore! Learn! Record on Androids! iNaturalist allows you to record your observations from the natural world for free and contribute them to iNaturalist.org, a social network for naturalists. Users can get started quickly by reviewing the app’s guide. A recent update was added in June 2013.

 

projectnoah8. Project Noah

Free for iPhones and Androids, Project Noah is the best way to share your wildlife encounters and help document our planet’s biodiversity. Naturalists can upload their own wildlife photos or review those uploaded by others from across the globe.

 

trails9. Trails-GPS Tracker

Trails-GPS Tracker is the first GPS app that allows you to record, export, and import tracks directly on your iPhone! Prepare and review your outdoor adventures on the iPad as well, since there’s an easy exchange between iPhone and iPad. Priced at $3.99, Trails was first released five years ago, so it’s had several upgrades.

 

treebook10. TreeBook

TreeBook is the authoritative guide to 100 of the most common trees in North America. It was produced by veteran forester Steve Nix (of forestry.about.com fame), and developed by Ash Mishra (developer of the very popular CBC Hockey and CBC Radio apps). This free application’s easy, intuitive interface provides a way to determine the type of tree you’re looking at — with images, search, synonyms for trees, layman terms, and, for the more scientifically minded, detailed terminology.

 

wheresabear11. Where’s a Bear

Available for 99 cents, Google’s Android smartphone and their developers Blackbonnet have just launched an app called Where’s a Bear. It’s a great service for tourists who want to track wildlife sighting alerts for not only those big old scary grizzly bears, but any other species of your choice. Its intent is to allow users to maximize their Yellowstone vacation time by taking the guesswork out of finding the best places to see the park’s primary residents.

 

Yellowstone National Park The Official Guide on the App Store on iTunes12. Yellowstone Wildlife

The Yellowstone Wildlife app which doesn’t include the “finding the bear” feature (noted above) is now also available on iPhones and iPads as well as Androids. You can obtain real-time updates of Yellowstone wildlife sightings for free.

 

natgeobirdsicon13. National Geographic Birds

Now available for $9.99, National Geographic Birds was designed for iPhones, iPads, and iPod Touch. It offers an innovative, beautiful, and interactive field guide to the birds of North America. Whether you’re new to bird watching or already an expert, this completely updated and redesigned app makes spotting, identifying, and understanding birds easier than ever.

 

Wildobs14. WildObs Observer

Check out more than 1,000 species of mammals, birds, snakes, bugs, worms, WildObs Observer. Designed by Neukadye, this free iPhone app lets you record wildlife and contribute them both to your database, and to National Wildlife Federation’s Wildlife Watch program. It’s a neat experience to learn what naturalists around you are seeing and uploading.

If you’ve never taken that walk in the woods prior to reading this blog, perhaps these innovative apps will motivate you to do so now. Whether you have a passion for flowers, trees, plants, mammals, birds reptiles, rocks, or anything in between, technology can be your friend when you take that next fork in the road.


Drew Hendricks

About the Author

This is a guest post by Drew Hendricks, an environmental and tech addict that has written for a variety of publications including Technorati, Forbes and Huffington Post.

 

 

Feline or Canine? How to Identify their Tracks

Canine and Feline tracks are probably the most confusing tracks you’ll find yet with just a little knowledge you can be an expert at identifying each.  Carefully studying the image below you should be able to pick out a few of the different features each animal track displays.

tracks canine feline

Looking at the feline track above you should notice the following;

  • There are no claws showing. Cats tracks seldom show claws since their claws are felineretractable. This is true for all cats including Mtn. Lions, Bobcat, Lynx and domestic cats
  • The heel pad of felines will show three lobes on the back edge and usually two lobes on the front edge. If you look closely it resembles an “M”.
  • The overall shape of the track is appears round or as wide as it is long.

 

Looking at the canine track you should notice;

  • Four distinct claw marks at the end of each toe.canine
  • The front of the heel pad has only one single lobe and the back edge of the heel pad has only two lobes.
  • The overall appearance of the track is rectangular.

 

 

If there are claw marks present then it’s a safe bet it’s a canine. However, there is one exception to that rule, Gray Fox. Gray Fox have semi- retractable claws so you’ll want to also check the number of lobes on the heel pad to be sure. The majority of the time though their claw marks will be present in their track.  The following measurements might help if you want to distinguish what species of canine or feline your trying to identify.

Felines

  • Domestic Cat –  1 to 1 1/2 inches long or wide
  • Bobcat –  2 inches long or wide
  • Lynx – 3 1/2 to 4 inches long or wide
  • Mtn. Lion – 3 to 4 1/2 inches long or wide

Canines

  • Gray Fox –  1 1/2 inches wide by 2 inches long
  • Red Fox –  1 3/4 inches wide by 2 1/4 inches long
  • Gray Wolf – 3 3/4 inches wide by up to 5 inches long
  • Coyote –  2 inches wide by 2 1/2 inches long
  • Domestic Dog –  Variable size from a small lap dog, 1 inch long to a full size St. Bernard that could measure up to 5 inches long.

In most parts of North America canine tracks will surely be the majority of tracks you’ll find. However, knowing the difference between feline and canine tracks and what to look for, you may just be in for a treat and discover Bobcat or if you’re really lucky a nice set of Mtn. Lion tracks.  Good luck and Happy Tracking!!

 

Beaver Tracks & Sign

Beavers  tracks and sign can be found just about everywhere in North America, at least everywhere there’s a water source. Besides water there also has to be an ample amount of trees to fulfill their dietary needs, birch, willow and aspen to name a few. Beavers, Castor canadensis aren’t the most secretive animal inhabiting the land, if their around you’ll find evidence of their sign everywhere, dams, lodges, wood chips, felled trees, stumps and scent posts.

 

The tree in this picture at right was chewed by a beaver. Beavers eat the inner bark or cambium layer of trees. They also  fell tree to get at the buds, leaves and newer, younger branches.

 

This image on the left shows a closeup of what a beaver chew looks like. Beavers as do other rodents chew at a 45 degree angle. You might find their chews several feet off the ground in the spring and summer months which would mean that that particular chew was made while the snow was deep sometime during the winter.

Beavers have unique tracks, some times their hard to find because  they drag their tail as well as  branches as they amble along. The tail and dragging branches will obscure their tracks if not wipe them out all together.

 

Here’ a perfect example of a beaver drag. In this particular picture the drag was about 5 foot wide  obscuring all tracks that the beaver had left.

If you do find a nice clear set of tracks most likely they’ll be in the mud on the waters edge. Their front feet resemble small human like hands 2.5 to 3 inches long with 5 toes. Often times the front foot may only show 4 toes in the tracks but they’ll still look like long fingers with claws at the ends. A beavers rear track can be up to 7 inches long and looks somewhat triangular in shape. The hind tracks also have 5 toes and you should see some evidence of webbing between them. Claw marks should also be present in the tracks.  Beavers have a gait pattern of a pacer, meaning all four of their feet will register independently. Some times however the hind tracks will  register on top of the front ones. With the wide tail drag and the unmistakable sign they leave you shouldn’t have any trouble identifying beaver tracks or mixing them up with any other mammals.

A good place to look for  beaver tracks  is  along  the muddy edges of their dams.  You should also be able to find the spots they enter and exit the water.  Beavers will use the same entry and exit points along the shore to go out and forage for food. Many times these trails will be churned up mud and their tracks will be evident. I have found some of my best beaver tracks on the winter ice where there’s a light snow cover.  If you see an open hole in the ice with sticks or branches strewn about you may be able to find some good tracks there, just make sure the ice is at least 3 inches thick before you venture onto it.

One of the  other signs that beavers leave are their scat. Beaver scat can be very difficult to find since most times it’s deposited underwater, but if you know where to look it will be much easier to spot.  Beaver scat is in the shape of a pellet either round or elongated, about 3/4 to 1 inch in diameter.  Their scat resembles  wood chips or sawdust stuck together and is usually a light brown to tan color. If you look at the well worn entry trails into the water you may find scat just under the waters surface or at the edge of their dam. The pellets are usually scattered or solitary not found in a large pile like that of a deer or rabbit would be.

 

I found this adult beaver skull stuck in a dam on one of my outings a few years back.  This shows a perfect example of the their incisors. The incisors are orange colored from the iron in the beavers diet.   I don’t know how it met its demise but it will made an excellent addition to my skull collection.

 

If you stumble across beaver habitat on your next outing scout around and see if you can locate some tracks or scat. Learning how to identify animal sign and the creatures that left them can be a very rewarding experience.

Happy Hiking !!

 

 

 

If you carry it in, you carry it out, please put litter in it’s place!!!

 

 

 

 

Findmysoft.com, Aimal Track App Review.

Were very pleased to post the latest review of the MyNature Animal Track App. The app was reviewed by George Norman of findmysoft.com Thank you George!!

 

I’m a fan of the AMC TV series “The Walking Dead” and one thing that always impresses me is how Darryl (played by Norman Reedus, actor you may know from The Boondock Saints) can track animals and people in the forest. If that were me, and I’m not ashamed to admit it, I would be in a lot of trouble. My tracking skills are, well, less than spectacular.

Whenever I need help with something, I turn to software for a helping hand. There are apps out there for everything I can think of and that includes tracking animals in the forest. The MyNature Inc-developed and appropriately named app MyNature Animal Tracks is the one that will come to my aid in this situation.

When you’re out fishing or hiking or doing something else and you see a set of tracks, take out your iPhone, launch the MyNature Animal Tracks app and it will help you figure out what animals left those tracks, which way the animal is heading, and how long ago the animal left those tracks.

The developer advises anyone who wants to get the MyNature Animal Tracks app to ask themselves a few questions and if the answer to those questions is affirmative, then go ahead and get the app. Those questions are:
Are you looking for an easy and fun way to identify animal tracks and scat?
Did you always wish you knew how to identify tracks you were finding?
Do you want to make your time outdoors more educational and enjoyable?

You don’t have to be an expert to identify tracks in the wild; you just need the right app to help you out. That app is MyNature Animal Tracks. It is a user-friendly app with a large database that will help you identify what animals left the set of tracks you’re looking at and how long ago those tracks were made. If you’re an outdoorsy type of man who needs this sort of functionality, you’re very well advised to get the MyNature Animal Tracks app.

What we like

  • Easy to use
  • Nice interface
  • Large database with illustrations and beautiful photos
  • Sound files for an example of each animal’s vocalization
  • Doesn’t need internet access
  • Built-in ruler
  • Journal
  • Numerous rave reviews from the media and the users
MyNature Animal Tracks Editor’s Review Rating

MyNature Animal Tracks has been reviewed by on 08 Dec 2011. Based on the user interface, features and complexity, Findmysoft has rated MyNature Animal Tracks 5 out of 5 stars, naming it Essential

 

 

Nature Apps

This past week saw the addition of four more of our National Park Tracks, Trees & Wildflower Apps released for the iPhone. Yellowstone National Park, Glacier, Grand Teton and Grand Canyon National Park join Yosemite and Sequoia Kings Canyon in our growing list of Nature Apps.  The MyNature National Park App series are specific identification field guides for animal tracks, tree and wildflowers species found within each national park.  You’ll be able to identify over 30 mammal tracks, native trees and anywhere from 120 to 240 wildflowers depending on which national park your visiting.

Were proud to add the National Park series of nature apps to our growing list of available apps for your iPhone.  Our flagship app MyNature Animal Tracks which recently underwent a major update and the MyNature Tree Guide is currently in the shop where were updating that popular guide with a new, sleeker UI and adding a few dozen new species of trees to the list.

What’s in store for future Nature Apps with us?  Well, we would like to expand our National Park series with 1 or 2 new parks in the coming year. Within the next few weeks our newest app on Fishing Knots should be in the app store. That app will feature 13 common fishing knots and is a preview of what to expect in the MyNature Fish Guide which were hoping to have out by the Spring of 2012, just in time for Trout season!

We here at MyNature Inc. would like to thank you for your support over the past two years and we know that with your continued support and positive feedback we can achieve future growth in the field of Nature Apps and bring you exceptional content to help you enjoy your days in the field.

Happy Hiking  !!

****Huge Independence Day Sale****

In celebration of the birthday of the United States of America we’re having a HUGE 70% off our regularly priced apps. In fact every app we have on nature is reduced to $2.99 for the 4th of July weekend only.

Nature Apps

National Park Series

This 4th of July weekend is the perfect time to pick up one of the MyNature Apps, get outdoors and experience the beauty this great country has and celebrate the birth of the greatest nation on Earth.

Happy Birthday America!!!!!

Apps for the Great Outdoors

Much to our surprise we found out that our flagship app MyNature Animal Tracks was selected  by Apple for their “Apps for the Great Outdoors”  campaign.  This isn’t the first time Apple has featured our Animal Track app.  Last summer with the introduction of the iPhone 4 Apple had used the track app as one of their featured selections in their advertising campaign.  Were very pleased to be selected again and find it an honor to be in the spotlight, but more importantly that were helping people connect with the great outdoors and providing an education in nature.

Follow our tracks to the iTunes store and look for this icon. 

With the Mynature Animal Track app you’ll be able to tell the difference between Moose tracks and Elk tracks, Grizzly Bear scat and Mtn. Lion scat. The difference in shape of a Bobcat and Red Fox Track, read animal sign, how to make plaster cast and the best places to find tracks.

Enjoy the Great Outdoors !!

Arbor Day Sale

One of our favorite days of the year , Arbor Day is tomorrow and to help celebrate the occasion we’ll be once again having a BIG app day sale.  Tomorrow and tomorrow only!! all 6 of the MyNature Apps will be on sale for .99 cents, that’s a huge savings of $6.00 off our Animal Tracks and Tree Guide to as high as $9.00 off our National Park series.

Coming off our huge giveaway last week for Earth Day where we had more than 8,000 downloads total over a 32 hour period we wanted to once again offer a special to help promote an “Education in Nature”

If you ever wanted to tell the difference between a Moose track and an Elks track, or  Moose Scat from a Beavers (yes, their somewhat similar)  then you definitely want to stop by the App Store and pick up a copy of the MyNature Track and Scat App on Friday. We don’t skimp on our apps, we have all the mammals you would be interested in identifying included in our guide, over 45 total and each animal featured has a complete library of images including  illustrated track and gait drawings, multiple digital images of tracks in the wild, gait patterns, scat, animal sign, range maps, sound files and an image of the animal itself.

What Would Arbor Day be without a Tree? Pretty boring actually, but no worries we have over 200 trees in our Tree Guide that you would commonly find across North America. Did you know that we were in fact the first to offer a tree app that actually helped you identify a tree.  All you have to do is answer 1 or any combination of 15 easy to understand illustrated questions to give you a list of possible trees that match your answer. The more questions you can answer the more specific the search results will be and in many instances lead you to the exact tree. You’ll  be able to quickly tell the difference between a Red Pine and a Whitebark Pine, what the difference is between a Spruce and a Fir Tree. Identify a tree by the color of its bark or type of fruit. We didn’t skimp on this guide either, for every tree included in the MyNature Tree Guide you can view an illustrated drawing of the leaf or needle, a digital image of the leaf or needle as well as the fall color for many of the trees. We also have digital pictures of each trees bark, fruit, profile and range maps as well.  Were even planning a future update in the next few months and we’ll be adding roughly 24 more trees as well as a new user interface.

If your heading out to Yosemite or Sequoia National Parks this summer then you should definitely be here for Fridays big Arbor Day sale and save $9.00 on our Tracks, Trees and Wildflower app for those parks.  These are park specific guides, only the animals, trees and wildflowers that are found there are included in our National Park series.  We have the same great features from our Tracks and Tree apps combined with  Wildflowers for a very informative app on the flora and fauna of Yosemite or Sequoia National Parks. The wildflower section alone contains over 240 commonly found wildflowers. The only thing more knowledgeable than this app would be a park ranger!! Keep an eye out in the next month for this growing series of National Park apps to include the Grand Canyon, Glacier, Grand Teton and Yellowstone National Parks.

Happy Arbor Day!!

Yosemite Tracks, Trees and Wildflowers PR

Yosemite Tracks, Trees and Wildflowers for iOS –

Complete Field Guide

Wevertown, New York – MyNature today introduces Yosemite Tracks, Trees & Wildflowers 1.1 for iOS, their app that provides a complete, personal field guide to identifying the Animal Tracks, Trees, and Wildflowers of Yosemite National Park. Users will be able to easily identify tracks, scat, and sign left by more than 30 animals that inhabit the park, native trees, and 240 wildflowers. The app features searchable databases of: more than 30 tracks, with 700 photos, plus animal vocalizations; more than 30 species of trees with hundreds of drawings and photos; and 240 wildflowers with 680 images.

In each of the three categories, Tracks, Trees, and Wildflowers, the app helps the user make an identification by asking a series of questions that will greatly limit the number of possible candidates. The app is completely self-contained and requires no Internet connection. MyNature donates one dollar for each Yosemite app purchased to a general fund that is distributed to various national park foundations.

On launch in portrait mode, Yosemite Tracks, Trees & Wildflowers presents a title screen with four icon buttons: Tracks, Trees, Wildflowers, and MyNature Journal. Touching Tracks brings in the Animal Tracks Menu via a push transition. There are six buttons on the menu, including: Identify Tracks (six main categories, plus dozens of sub-categories); Identify Scat ((six main categories, plus dozens of sub-categories); All Animal Sounds (32 vocalizations, plus hundreds of images of Track and Gait); View All Animals (alphabetized list of 32 Species, plus hundreds of images of Track and Gait); Life List (personal log of type of identification of 32 Species, plus location, description, photo, etc.); and Other Info (Introduction & Directions, Field Notes, Making Plaster Casts, Glossary, etc.). All screens include an empty text field for searching.

Identify Animal Tracks Features:
* A searchable database of seven illustrated categories based on track size and shape – includes only animals found in the park
* View illustrations and photographs of each animal’s tracks (front and hind), gait pattern, and sign they leave behind
* Listen to each animal’s vocalization
* View a full color image of each animal in the wild
* Identify animal scat by using illustrated examples of five categories on scat size and shape
* View multiple images of each animal’s scat in the wild for comparison
* Life List, Tracking Tips, Plaster Casting and much more

Selecting Trees from the title screen brings in the Tree Guide Menu, including: Trees With Leaves, Trees With Needles, View All Species, Life List, and Other Info. Touching Trees With Leaves allows the user to search the tree database via a 15-item questionnaire, or list all 16 Species (Names, Descriptions, and hundreds of images). Choosing Trees With Needles also allows the user to search the tree database via a 15 item questionnaire, or list all 17 Species (Names, Descriptions, and hundreds of images). Selecting View All Species displays a scrollable list of all 33 tree Species (Names, Descriptions, and hundreds of images). The Life List allows the naturalist to fill in blank text fields (My Experience, Title, Location, Description, Images, Save to Life List). Other Info displays the following buttons: Directions, Tree Facts, Scientific Names and Meanings, Tree Morphology, Glossary, Credits and References, etc. All screens include a text search function.

Identify Trees Features:
* A 14 question illustrated search – just answer one or more questions and hit submit to see which trees match the characteristics selected
* Full color digital images of each tree’s leaf or needle, fruit or cone, profile, and bark
* A complete description of identifying characteristics for each tree
* Your own personal Life List to record the trees you have identified
* View all Species, Scientific Names and Their Meanings, Tree Facts and more

The Flower Guide Menu offers: Identify Flowers, View All Species, Life List, and Other Info. Identify Flowers includes a 15 question search, of which the user need answer one to five questions for an accurate identification. View All Species displays a scrollable list of 240 species with common and scientific names. Touching any name allows the user to drill down to descriptions, drawings, full screen photos, a virtual ruler, etc. All screens are searchable via text input.

Identify Wildflowers Features:
* A 15 question illustrated search – answer one or more questions and submit your choices to see which flower has been found
* Illustrated drawings of every flower in the app, vital for comparing leaf position, leaf shape, and the overall appearance of the flower for identification
* A beautiful full color image of each flower
* Your personal Life List to record your discoveries
* Flower Morphology, and how Pollination works
* A built in ruler and much more

“This is the first iOS app specifically designed to identify the flora and fauna of Yosemite National Park in California,” stated company spokesperson, Jeff Greco. “Everyone who enjoys exploring nature, no matter what their level of knowledge and experience, will love using Yosemite Tracks, Trees & Wildflowers.”

Language Support:
* US English

Device Requirements:
* iPhone, or iPod touch
* iOS 3.0 or later (iOS 4.3 tested)
* 199 MB

Pricing and Availability:
Yosemite Tracks, Trees & Wildflowers 1.1 for iOS is $7.99 (USD) and available through the App Store in the Reference category. Review copies are available upon request.

MyNature
Yosemite Tracks, Trees & Wildflowers 1.1
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Located in Wevertown, New York, the MyNature Inc. team is a small independent software company founded by Jeff Greco and Laura Greco. With a focus on the OS X and iOS platforms, MyNature’s passion is to promote an education in nature through smartphone technology. Copyright (C) 2011 MyNature Inc. All Rights Reserved. Apple, the Apple logo, iPhone, iPod, and iPad are registered trademarks of Apple Inc. in the U.S. and/or other countries.