September 22, 2020

MyNature Animal Tracks MyNature Tree Guide MyNature Animal Tracks MyNature Fishing App

A Great Week for MyNature!

This turned out to be a great week for MyNature with a little free publicity on our nature apps around the country, in fact around the world. Our Animal Track App was mentioned in an article for Scientific American as one of the 6 best apps for the outdoors. You can view that article on the Scientific American website.

A pleasant surprise arrived in our PO Box just yesterday and that was the recent issue of iPhone Life Magazine. I had no idea they were doing a selection of best app for the outdoors again but hey, I won’t complain. The Animal Track App was not only one of the featured apps with a 5 star rating for the outdoors but the Track Icon was also featured on the front cover. That’s big for us, we’ve been in iPhone Life a total of three times now but never had we made the front cover. Obviously the people over at iPhone Life love our Track App and we thank them for that. Keep on Tracking iPhone Life!!

We were also invited to join the #B2SAppSpecials on Twitter. That involved adding our Animal Tracks and Tree App to a special back to school sale promotion for educational apps for teachers to use in the classroom. For this weekend both those apps are on sale for $4.99  which is $2.00 off our regular pricing. Anyone can stop by the app store and take advantage of the special weekend pricing to get an education in nature. promotion for educational apps for teachers to use in the classroom. For this weekend both those apps are on sale for $4.99  which is $2.00 off our regular pricing. Anyone can stop by the app store and take advantage of the special weekend pricing to get an education in nature.

Happy Hiking!!

What’s A Good Track App?

As the app market expands more and more Animal Track apps are coming out. The real question is are they any good and what should they contain for content that is useful. If you were to purchase one, what would you expect to get in return for your hard earned dollar. Lets start with the number of mammals to feature. The average person roaming the woods today is more interested in larger mammals, after all those are the tracks that are most noticeable when your hiking. A rough calculation of the larger mammals of North America bigger than a Weasel would be around 45 to 50 different species and family members.  These would be the most common animals to be seen or leave sign for which anyone would be interested in identifying.  Your outdoors for a reason, your either hiking, camping, hunting or fishing, heck you may even be on a golf coarse.  The point is when you finally find a track you are curious about identifying do you want to identify it and get on with your activity or do you want to spend extra time on your smart phone wading through numerous animals that the average person will rarely find a track of.  It’s sad that everyone is on the go and it’s a hurry up let’s get where were going society but that’s the reality of it and that’s one thing a track app should do, quickly identify what you found.  Apps loaded with Polar Bears are nice but how many of you will be looking for Muskox tracks in the arctic region? Would you really take the time to differentiate between a Meadow Mouse and a Deer Mouse or would you just be content to know it’s a mouse track.  An app that contains around 50 to 60 animals for all of North America is more than sufficient.

A good app should have a search feature broken into categories and then search again by track size leaving you with 2 or 3 results to further pick from rather than 7 or more.   The main thing especially for kids is for the app to hold your attention long enough to identify an animal. If there is to much time involved in searching then it becomes a job and we want this to be quick, fun and educational after all were outdoors for a reason and it’s not to spend additional time on our phone.

The bulk of any track app should also contain digital images of tracks and the animal itself and lets not forget sound files of the vocalization of each animal.  All these features should be self contained in the app, relying on a wireless connection to access these features leaves the app useless when the majority of outdoor adventures take place where there is a lack of wireless service. If you are thinking of getting a Animal Track app then make sure that it does not rely on cell service to use.  If it doesn’t have built in digital images of what a track looks like in the wild then what good is it?

Once your app ID’s an animal it should give you some basic information on habitat and life cycle, two paragraphs maximum. Remember were outdoors having fun, you can save all the heavy reading on the animal for later when your home if you want to learn more.

Throw in a ruler feature and you have a pretty concise app, one that is accurate, searches quickly and has the right amount of content all contained in one nice neat self stored package. Keep all these in mind when you decide to take the plunge into an Animal Track app and you’ll have a more rewarding and I hope educational experience on your next outing.

So all that said what’s new from us here at MyNature. Well, we have been working on an update for the past three months to our own track app. Once the new version is released (which will still be a while) we’ll have a searchable database for the addition of scat to the app. We’ll also have additional digital images of tracks, animal gaits and sign left by each animal. We redesigned the journal page to make it more functional and are also adding some social networking features for Twitter and Facebook.  There will also be the addition of the all to popular life list to keep track of your discoveries.  Were also going to have a web based site to post your identifications to as well as  images.  With your participation we should have a very complete database to refer to for animal sign, scat and tracks of North America. Some of the new features will need a wireless service to utilize but the app and all images will still be self contained as they are now.   Don’t worry you’ll hear when the update is done we won’t forget to tell you!!

Happy Tracking!

Mink Tracks

One of the best ways to narrow down what animal tracks you found is to study the gait pattern the animal used. Animals are categorized by Family and each family has it’s own preferred method of transportation.  Animals in the Weasel family use a bounding gait. A bound is a when the animal pushes off his hind feet and does a short leap landing on his front feet with the rear tracks registering just behind the front. All four feet are in a tight group resembling  a small rectangle.  The image of the  Mink’s gait at right shows just how this looks. 

 The members of the Weasel family that most commonly utilize this type of gait pattern are the Mink, Short-tailed Weasel, Long tailed Weasel,  Least Weasel, Otter, Fisher, Pine Marten and Badger.  Once you have identified the gait pattern you can measure the individual tracks to narrow down what animal tracks you found.  Paying attention to the habitat you found the tracks in is just as important as the tracks themselves. If you observed this type of gait pattern in the middle of a coniferous forest with no water nearby this would point more toward a Marten or a Fishers track.  Close to a stream bank or body of water would tend to be an Otter or Mink. The tracks above were following a stream bank and the individual size of the tracks gave this animal away as a Mink.

Of coarse it’s not always that easy is it?  As I mentioned members of the Weasel family prefer a bounding gait and use that most times to travel but they don’t always bound.  You may find tracks that resemble the gait of the Bear family as in the Otter image below. This Otter was utilizing the pacing gait where all four feet register separately not grouped as in a bound. Rest assured he eventually broke back into his bounding pattern a short distance away.

 If you follow a set of tracks far enough you may get a chance to see the various gait patterns used by each animal. Just remember that the most predominantly used gait will point you toward which Family the animal you found belongs to.

       Happy Tracking!!

Animal Track App

Were getting ready to update the MyNature Animal Track app in the next several weeks and we would like your input on what you would like to see this app do in the future. A few of the additions we’ll be making are;

  • More gait pattern images for each animal.
  • Additional individual track images
  • Images for sign made by animals.
  • A searchable database for animal scat.
  • Digital images of scat.
  • Social Network features so you can post directly to Face Book, Twitter or Flickr.
  • A life list of animal tracks.
  • An interactive web page for posting your track or scat finds to a database.
  • A new layout to the Mynature Journal page which includes a basic information layout form for time, temperature, location and weather conditions. A feature to save your entries individually and the ability to go back and edit your entries.
  • The ability to upload your own track or scat images directly into the app.

We invite you to leave your comments or suggestions on how to improve the the app and make your outdoor experience more rewarding. What would you like to see in future upgrades? Please let us know and we will take them into consideration. Together we can make this the best app on Animal Tracks out there.         Happy tracking!!

Identifying Tracks

Many times identifying an animals track isn’t the simplest thing to do. You can buy all the books and yes even the apps on tracking and still be left wondering what track lies in front of you. It’s not always as simple as matching up a picture to the imprint left, more often than not you need to have an investigative mind. In light fluffy snow  some tracks appear distorted as the animals foot drags snow back into to the track as they move.  Some tracks may just suddenly disappear all together  and your left to figure that out where they went. Did they jump out of your line of sight, climb a tree, fly away or was the animal swept up by a hawk or owl.

In the picture (not a great one I admit) everything is there to identify the animal that visited this spot and what happened. While not the clearest of tracks the general form of it is still in tact as well as the stride and the trail width, all clues left to who it belongs to.  The fact that it suddenly dissapeared  and you found no other tracks in the area or trees close by that it could have climbed will be a huge clue.   Hopefully by now you came to the conclusion that it was some kind of bird that suddenly flew away. But what kind?  Was it a Grouse, Turkey, Crow or maybe even a Heron?

If your in the middle of the forest with no water around you can immediately discount it being a Heron. That’s going to leave you with three choices, now what?  Well, if the tracks have been walking for quite a distance that’s going to knock the possibilities of it being a Crow off the list. Crows won’t walk a long distance on the ground and if the do then they will hop, clearly the tracks above aren’t hopping. Now were left with either the choice of a Turkey or Grouse.  Now you can go back to an individual track measure the size, even if it isn’t a clear print and come to a conclusion based on the size difference between the two birds on which one it is.  The one in the picture was 4 inches long.  The only animal it could be was a Turkey since a Grouse is around 2 inches.

Tracking can be a great way to spend some time outdoors. There’s no need to have a destination to get to, no time limit, no crowded trails to follow, just you the woods and the animal your following.  Life doesn’t get much more laid back than that.        Happy Tracking!

Beavers on your iPhone!

That’s right, there are beavers on your iPhone but don’t worry they won’t be chewing through your memory. What beavers are on your iPhone are located in the MyNature Animal Track app. Next time you come across some unknown tracks near the waters edge you can use the app to measure the tracks, compare the outline, find out the gait pattern, see a beautiful image of one in the wild and learn about their habitat. Below are just a few pictures of what beaver sign you might find on your next outing.

Happy Tracking!!

MyNature Press Release

MyNature Animal Tracks for iPhone – Only Track I.D. App on the Market – Published on 01/15/10

IMMEDIATE RELEASE

MyNature Inc. today released MyNature Animal Tracks 1.0 for iPhone and iPod Touch users. This is the first app on the market that can identify animal tracks using smart phone technology. Users can learn about the animal whose tracks they’ve found, see images, listen to the sounds they make and even find out what animals may be in the area where they are. Using categorized track illustrations, users can match what they’ve found against the listings in MyNature Animal Tracks.

North Creek, NY – Announcing that MyNature Inc., the developers of MyNature Animal Tracks, are excited about launching the first and only app that can identify animal tracks using smart phone technology. Users can learn about the animal whose tracks they’ve found, see images, listen to the sounds they make and even find out what animals may be in the area where they are.

No other application can do what MyNature Animal Tracks does. It makes an educational experience fun in new way. Using categorized track illustrations, users can match what they’ve found against the listings in MyNature Animal Tracks. After that, they can listen to vocalizations, see photos and range maps, or read more to learn about the animal that left the track. The app can also alert users to which animals they may find in any area in North America. This is helpful for being informed of the locations of dangerous, as well as interesting species. A user can then keep an eye out for specific tracks to avoid or follow.

MyNature Animal Tracks also includes a place for making notes, which is particularly useful for those who enjoy ‘collecting’ tracks. Users will find tips in this app that guide them to finding tracks, making plaster casts and other valuable information that has been gathered by nature field guides.

Some of the MyNature Animal Tracks Features
* Searchable database on track size and shape featuring 7 search categories. For example 4 toes round in shape the Felid family, 4 toes oval to square in shape the Canid family, hooved tracks, tracks with 5 toes, tracks that are birdlike and much more
* Clearly illustrated track drawings showing both fore and hind prints with track measurements along with a description of the animal’s habitat and life cycle
* Illustrated images of each animal’s common gait as well as other gait patterns they may use
* Digital images of an actual track of each animal in the wild
* Range maps to reference an animal’s presence in your location
* Sound waves of each animal’s vocalizations
* Full color digital image of what the animal looks like in its natural environment
* Handy ruler to measure and aid in track identification
* MyNature journal, where you can personally record the tracks you’ve found along with the location, weather conditions or just your own personal thoughts about your day in the field
* Tips on finding tracks, plaster casting and much more

Currently, MyNature Animal Tracks covers all animals in North America, from the smallest creature to the largest. If the track belongs to an animal on this continent, it’s in the app waiting to be discovered by users. MyNature Animal Tracks is a fully-loaded, one of a kind app that’s great for kids and adults alike. It is the most fun a nature loving person can have while learning.

Device Requirements:
iPhone or iPod Touch 3.0 or later

Pricing and Availability:
MyNature Animal Tracks is only $6.99 (USD) and available worldwide exclusively through the App Store in the Education category. Please specify the website or blog you represent when making your request.

MyNature Animal Tracks 1.0: http:/
Purchase and Download: http://itunes.apple.com/us/app/mynature-animal-tracks/id338980245?mt=8
Demonstration Video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mtkHPIs2GYQ
Media Assets: http://s900.photobucket.com/albums/ac205/mynatureinc/MyNature%20Animal%20Track%20App%20Screenshots/

MyNature Inc. is devoted to educating people about nature in a simple, easy to understand format. MyNature designs field guides that are functional and enjoyable to use. Copyright (C) 2010 Edward Turner & Mobile-App-Marketing-Makeover. All Rights Reserved. Apple, the Apple logo, iPhone and iPod are registered trademarks of Apple Inc. in the U.S. and/or other countries.

###

Jeff Greco
Media Contact for MyNature Inc.

mynature@mynaturesite.com

iPhone and Animal Tracks

As the snow starts to pile up distinguishing individual tracks of larger animals can get a little tricky. Most tracks of heavier animals fill in with snow as one foot is lifted and the next in line pushes more into the imprint. Often times their trail  may just appear as a trough throw the snow obscuring most of the details. When this happens if your not lucky enough to find an identifiable print you need to look more at the animals gait pattern, trail width and stride.  Not all animals traveling gaits are the same, some are bounders, some are pacers and some are diagonal walkers. Learning their gait patterns will eliminate some possibilities of which animals tracks  your looking at.  Just as their gait is different so to is their trail width. Trail width is the measurement from the outside of  the left track to the outside of the right track. If you can distinguish in the deep snow the edges of the tracks then you have narrowed down your choices even further. The last measurement to help you out is the stride of the animal. The stride is the measurement from the back edge of one track to the back edge of the next same track. An Elk will have a larger stride than a Mule deer or Whitetail.

Just because the snow gets deeper doesn’t mean identification is impossible. Next time your out bring along the MyNature Animal Track app, everything you need to know about stride, trail width and gait patterns are just a push  button away. So pull on your long johns, strap on the snowshoes and hit the woods and see what’s living in your back yard.

Otters on Your iPhone

Yep!! there’s an app for that to. Whatever you wanted to know about an Otter or any other mammal is now on the iPhone. Learn  how to identify their tracks, about their habitat, listen to the sound they make and much more. The tracks below were made by an Otter and you can see the different gait patterns it uses to travel. Most often Otters will use a bounding gait where all four feet register close to one another and the track sets will be spaced one to two feet apart, it’s tail may not be show in it’s trail when bounding. Otters will also use a walking gait where each track registers seperately as in the picture below. The tail drag is a dead give away when walking.  You can look for other clues too as to which animal left a set of tracks. Does it go up a tree? does it go into the water?  what size are the feet and the trail width?  All the evidence left behind will point to which animals track you found.  Good luck on your next outing and don’t forget to pick up the MyNature Animal Track App on the way!

iPhone Animal Tracks

MyNature Animal Tracks for the iPhone has been pretty consistent at receiving 5 star ratings. Stop by the iTunes store and pick up the app today and start learning what’s sharing the woods with you on your next trip.