October 16, 2019

MyNature Animal Tracks MyNature Tree Guide MyNature Animal Tracks MyNature Fishing App

Garlic Mustard

Wildflowers are one of the most beautiful parts of Nature, a palette of colors that paint the landscape.

Garlic Mustard plant

Garlic Mustard, Alliaria petiolata is no exception. Clusters of small white four petaled, one of the early Spring bloomers, very pretty and very delicate looking.  So why do I pull them up whenever I see them growing?  Well, because they’re an invasive species of plant.  Invasive species are plants that aren’t common to an area, they spread quickly and overwhelm the native species that commonly grow in a certain ecosystem.  Some invasive species can actually produce chemicals that invade the soil around them and prohibit native plants from growing. They assure the survival of their own species and eradicate the native plants that inhabit the area.  Like most invasive species of plants Garlic Mustard is not fed on by insects or herbivores such as deer and rabbits. This aids in their ability to anchor themselves in an area and eventually wipe out all other species of wildflowers and grasses.  This continues up the food chain as well. Once the plant becomes established insects that feed on or nested in the native plants begin to disappear and in turn birds that fed on those insects disappear. It’s amazing on how one simple plant can have such a negative effect on an ecosystem.

Garlic Mustard flower

The plant is however edible for humans and is why it was introduced here to North America in the first place.The seeds and leaves are both edible and can be ground or chopped to be used  as seasonings.  When trying to identify Garlic Mustard look for  plants with small white flowers no more than one quarter inch wide in clusters on the ends of the plant stem. Each small flower has four petals. The leaves on the plant are alternate on the stem, with long leaf stalks and are egg shaped to triangular in shape.  The leaf itself is coarsely toothed and measures up to six inches long. One good method to identify the plant is to crush a leaf between your fingers and check for a garlic aroma.  Garlic Mustard can reach a height of three feet and is usually found along roadsides, open woodlands and waste places, flowering from spring to early summer.

Garlic Mustard leaf

If you can positively identify the plant it’s best to pull it up by the roots and dispose of it.  Another method which is less destructive to the soil is to cut the stem at ground level. Place all the pulled or cut plants in a garbage bag for disposal or if permitted in your area burn the collected plants.

 

 

Above all else please make sure you have a positive identification before you harvest any plants in the wild.

 

MyNature Gives Big for Earth Day

Another Nature holiday has come and gone, Earth Day 2011 is over and with it our big App give away in celebration of  “An Education in Nature”  has ended.  I have to admit I was anxious to see the results of how many people took advantage of our Earth Day special.  I can honestly say I nearly fell out of the chair this morning when I saw the results, we gave a way a grand total of 6,663 apps in just a little over a 24 hour period.  The statistics are to me totally unbelievable that so many apps were downloaded in 1 day. Here’s the breakdown.

  • MyNature Animal Tracks                                  2,177 installs
  • MyNature Tree Guide                                         2,139 installs
  • MyNature Mammal Tracks                               1,006 installs
  • Yosemite Tracks, Trees & Wildflowers            950 installs
  • Sequoia Tracks, Trees & Wildflowers                  97 installs
  • MyNature State Tree Quiz                                     294 installs

6,663 total apps installed

What makes this even more incredible is the total retail value of that final figure. On any given day our Animal Track and Tree App retail for $6.99, the new National Park Apps will be listed at $9.99 each and our Mammal Track and State Tree Quiz sell for .99 cents each.  Here’s where I say Wow…… those totals have an incredible retail value give away of $41,914.53 !!!!

Now if anyone ever asks me what I did for Earth Day 2011 I can proudly smile and state that I helped 6,663 people with an “Education in Nature”.

Happy Tracking


Yosemite Tracks, Trees and Wildflowers PR

Yosemite Tracks, Trees and Wildflowers for iOS –

Complete Field Guide

Wevertown, New York – MyNature today introduces Yosemite Tracks, Trees & Wildflowers 1.1 for iOS, their app that provides a complete, personal field guide to identifying the Animal Tracks, Trees, and Wildflowers of Yosemite National Park. Users will be able to easily identify tracks, scat, and sign left by more than 30 animals that inhabit the park, native trees, and 240 wildflowers. The app features searchable databases of: more than 30 tracks, with 700 photos, plus animal vocalizations; more than 30 species of trees with hundreds of drawings and photos; and 240 wildflowers with 680 images.

In each of the three categories, Tracks, Trees, and Wildflowers, the app helps the user make an identification by asking a series of questions that will greatly limit the number of possible candidates. The app is completely self-contained and requires no Internet connection. MyNature donates one dollar for each Yosemite app purchased to a general fund that is distributed to various national park foundations.

On launch in portrait mode, Yosemite Tracks, Trees & Wildflowers presents a title screen with four icon buttons: Tracks, Trees, Wildflowers, and MyNature Journal. Touching Tracks brings in the Animal Tracks Menu via a push transition. There are six buttons on the menu, including: Identify Tracks (six main categories, plus dozens of sub-categories); Identify Scat ((six main categories, plus dozens of sub-categories); All Animal Sounds (32 vocalizations, plus hundreds of images of Track and Gait); View All Animals (alphabetized list of 32 Species, plus hundreds of images of Track and Gait); Life List (personal log of type of identification of 32 Species, plus location, description, photo, etc.); and Other Info (Introduction & Directions, Field Notes, Making Plaster Casts, Glossary, etc.). All screens include an empty text field for searching.

Identify Animal Tracks Features:
* A searchable database of seven illustrated categories based on track size and shape – includes only animals found in the park
* View illustrations and photographs of each animal’s tracks (front and hind), gait pattern, and sign they leave behind
* Listen to each animal’s vocalization
* View a full color image of each animal in the wild
* Identify animal scat by using illustrated examples of five categories on scat size and shape
* View multiple images of each animal’s scat in the wild for comparison
* Life List, Tracking Tips, Plaster Casting and much more

Selecting Trees from the title screen brings in the Tree Guide Menu, including: Trees With Leaves, Trees With Needles, View All Species, Life List, and Other Info. Touching Trees With Leaves allows the user to search the tree database via a 15-item questionnaire, or list all 16 Species (Names, Descriptions, and hundreds of images). Choosing Trees With Needles also allows the user to search the tree database via a 15 item questionnaire, or list all 17 Species (Names, Descriptions, and hundreds of images). Selecting View All Species displays a scrollable list of all 33 tree Species (Names, Descriptions, and hundreds of images). The Life List allows the naturalist to fill in blank text fields (My Experience, Title, Location, Description, Images, Save to Life List). Other Info displays the following buttons: Directions, Tree Facts, Scientific Names and Meanings, Tree Morphology, Glossary, Credits and References, etc. All screens include a text search function.

Identify Trees Features:
* A 14 question illustrated search – just answer one or more questions and hit submit to see which trees match the characteristics selected
* Full color digital images of each tree’s leaf or needle, fruit or cone, profile, and bark
* A complete description of identifying characteristics for each tree
* Your own personal Life List to record the trees you have identified
* View all Species, Scientific Names and Their Meanings, Tree Facts and more

The Flower Guide Menu offers: Identify Flowers, View All Species, Life List, and Other Info. Identify Flowers includes a 15 question search, of which the user need answer one to five questions for an accurate identification. View All Species displays a scrollable list of 240 species with common and scientific names. Touching any name allows the user to drill down to descriptions, drawings, full screen photos, a virtual ruler, etc. All screens are searchable via text input.

Identify Wildflowers Features:
* A 15 question illustrated search – answer one or more questions and submit your choices to see which flower has been found
* Illustrated drawings of every flower in the app, vital for comparing leaf position, leaf shape, and the overall appearance of the flower for identification
* A beautiful full color image of each flower
* Your personal Life List to record your discoveries
* Flower Morphology, and how Pollination works
* A built in ruler and much more

“This is the first iOS app specifically designed to identify the flora and fauna of Yosemite National Park in California,” stated company spokesperson, Jeff Greco. “Everyone who enjoys exploring nature, no matter what their level of knowledge and experience, will love using Yosemite Tracks, Trees & Wildflowers.”

Language Support:
* US English

Device Requirements:
* iPhone, or iPod touch
* iOS 3.0 or later (iOS 4.3 tested)
* 199 MB

Pricing and Availability:
Yosemite Tracks, Trees & Wildflowers 1.1 for iOS is $7.99 (USD) and available through the App Store in the Reference category. Review copies are available upon request.

MyNature
Yosemite Tracks, Trees & Wildflowers 1.1
Purchase and Download
Screenshot 1
Screenshot 2
Application Icon

Located in Wevertown, New York, the MyNature Inc. team is a small independent software company founded by Jeff Greco and Laura Greco. With a focus on the OS X and iOS platforms, MyNature’s passion is to promote an education in nature through smartphone technology. Copyright (C) 2011 MyNature Inc. All Rights Reserved. Apple, the Apple logo, iPhone, iPod, and iPad are registered trademarks of Apple Inc. in the U.S. and/or other countries.